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Exam Preparation

Body/PET Scan  |  CT Colonography  |  CT Scan with Contrast   |  CT Scan without Contrast  |  Fluoroscopy - Small Bowl Series  |  Fluoroscopy - Upper GI Series  |  Fluoroscopy - IVP  |  Fluoroscopy - Esophagram  |  Fluoroscopy - Barium Enema  |  Mammograms  |  Breast Ultrasound  |  MRI Questionnaire  |  MRI Prostate Questionnaire  |  Specific Ultrasounds

Body/PET Scan

We ask that you bring in your prescription, insurance card and photo ID. Please make sure all jewelry is left at home. Preparation for test is as follows:

  • For 4 hours before the exam, do not eat or drink (except for water: you may drink as much water as you like).
  • If you are a diabetic, you must abstain from any diabetic medications on the day of the exam.
  • You may take any other prescribed medications, including hypertension medication and seizure medication.
  • You must limit your exercise for at least 24 hours prior to the exam.
  • If you are, or think you may be pregnant please let us know as PET is not generally performed on pregnant women.

 

Please note this appointment will take approximately 3 hours.

When you come in you will be instructed to fill out some paper work. Once your paper work is completed a Technologist from the Nuclear Medicine department will call you in and set you up with an IV in your arm. A dose will be administered. You will then have to wait TWO hours before you get your scan. You may stay in the office or you can leave and then come back. Once you are called in for your exam scanning time is approximately 45 minutes.

If you have any questions regarding your exam please give us a call at (718) 428-1500.

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CT Colonography

GoLYTLEY or NuLYTELY
To Be Prescribed By Referring MD

The quality of your CT Colonography examination is largely dependent on your bowel preparation. To assure the best possible outcome, this preparation should be taken exactly as directed. Do not make any substitutions or changes without prior consultation with your doctor. In addition, you should read ALL instructions and ask your doctor if you have any questions.

You may have clear non alcoholic liquids as listed below.

Allowed:

  • Tea/black coffee (no milk or dairy creamer)
  • Apple juice, white grape, lemonade
  • Plain JELL-O (without any fruit or toppings)
  • Clear chicken/beef broth
  • Clear sodas (7-Up, Sprite & Ginger Ale)
  • Water
  • Popsicles

Avoid:

  • No soups (only broth)
  • No colas (avoid Mountain Dew)
  • No solid foods

If you have any questions regarding these instructions, please contact Pauline at (718) 428-1500.

Please complete the following the day before the test:

Breakfast 8:00 a.m.

Clear liquid diet from choices provided

Lunch 12:00 p.m.

Clear liquid diet from choices provided

FROM THIS POINT ON UNTIL YOU GO TO BED, IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO DRINK AT LEAST 8 OZ. OF WATER EVERY HOUR SO YOU DO NOT BECOME DEHYDRATED.

Approximately at 3:00 p.m.

Start to drink the GoLYTLEY or NuLYTELY (this needs to be prescribed by your doctor). Drink 8 oz. of GoLYTLEY or NuLYTELY every 15 minutes until it is all gone. This will take 4-5 hours to complete. After completing, 30 minutes later take two Bisacodyl (5mg) tablets.

What to Expect

You will have drunk several glasses before the first loose, watery bowel movement. At first, you may feel slightly bloated. Diarrhea will continue at least 1 hour after you finish drinking GoLYTLEY or NuLYTELY.

Dinner 5:00 p.m.

Clear liquid diet from choices provided

Bedtime

If there is any significant allergies to iodine please consult your doctor before taking Omnipaque. Mix a full bottle of Omnipaque with 5-6 oz. clear soda or Gatorade and drink.

Important: Do not drink or eat anything after midnight (12:00 a.m.)

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CT Scan with Contrast

  • Refrain from eating AND drinking 4 hours prior to your exam.
  • If you are diabetic, please stop taking the following medications 6 hours before your exam AND resume 48 hours after the exam. 
    • Glucophage
    • Metformin
    • Glucovance
    • Metaglip
    • Avandament
    • Fortamet
    • Glumetza
    • Diaformin
    • Riomet
    • Diabex
    • Actoplus
    • Janumet
  • If you are not taking any of the medications listed above, you may take your medication with a small amount of water.
  • If you are diabetic we will need your most current blood work; no more than 3 months old. We will also need your BUN and Creatinine levels.
  • If you are not diabetic, please follow the first step.
  • On the day of your appointment, please come in with your doctor’s prescription, insurance card and a picture ID.
  • Complete the CAT Scan Questionnaire
  • The following meds contain Metformin and can’t be taken for 6 hours before CT and 48 hours after CT with contrast:
    • Glucophage
    • Fortamet
    • Glumetza
    • Glucovance (Glyburide & Metformin)
    • Diabex
    • Diaformin
    • Riomet
    • Avandamet
    • Metaglip (Glipizide & Metformin)
    • Actoplus
    • Janumet (not Januvia)

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CT Scan without Contrast

  • Refrain from eating AND drinking 4 hours prior to your exam.
  • On the day of your appointment, please come in with your doctor’s prescription, insurance card and a picture ID.
  • Complete the CAT Scan Questionnaire
  • The following meds contain Metformin and can’t be taken for 6 hours before CT and 48 hours after CT without contrast:
    • Glucophage
    • Fortamet
    • Glumetza
    • Glucovance (Glyburide & Metformin)
    • Diabex
    • Diaformin
    • Riomet
    • Avandamet
    • Metaglip (Glipizide & Metformin)
    • Actoplus
    • Janumet (not Januvia)

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Fluoroscopy - Small Bowl Series

A Small Bowel series is an X-ray of the small intestine. This exam is often performed along with an Upper GI Series. For the exam, you must drink barium, which is a contrasting agent that enables us to see the anatomy of your digestive tract.

Preparation

  1. The night before testing, do not eat or drink anything after midnight. (food or liquid in your stomach and intestines may affect test results)
  2. Do not eat or drink anything the morning of the exam. If you must take medications, please take them with a small amount of water.

Small Bowel Series Explained

Prior to the exam, a radiologist will take a plain X-ray of your abdomen. This is known as a “scout film.” Not only will this X-ray give us a basic picture of your anatomy, we’ll also be able to tell if you followed the preparation guidelines. In preparation for the small bowel series test, the radiologist will briefly discuss your medical history, so that he or she can better perform the exam. Throughout the exam you’ll be required to swallow a barium drink in various positions on the X-ray table. The radiologist will be able to see your anatomy and capture any necessary photos using a fluoroscope. This special X-ray machine is connected to a TV screen. After the initial part of the test, a radiologic technologist will take X-ray pictures of your abdomen every 20 to 30 minutes, to observe the progression of the barium through the intestines. We will make sure you are as comfortable as possible throughout this process. Once the barium has progressed sufficiently through your intestines, the radiologist will capture a few more images of the small intestines using the fluoroscope. We recommend you bring reading material with you since the exam takes 4-5 hours or longer to complete.

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Fluoroscopy - Upper GI Series

An Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Series is performed to identify problems in the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The duodenum is the first section of the small intestine. The exam may also be performed to assess problems in the small intestine. An Upper GI Series enables your doctor to view a blockage, abnormal growth, an ulcer or a problem with the functioning of an organ.

Preparation

  1. The night before testing, do not eat or drink anything after midnight. (food or liquid in your stomach and intestines may affect test results)
  2. Do not eat or drink anything the morning of the exam. If you must take medications, please take them with a small amount of water.

Upper GI Series Explained

During the exam, you’ll have to drink barium, a thick, white liquid, similar to a milkshake. Barium coats the inside lining of the stomach, esophagus and duodenum; making them more visible on the X-rays. The radiologist can also indentify ulcers, scar tissue, hernias, abnormal growths, or any blockages hindering the normal path of food through the digestive system. Using a fluoroscope, the radiologist can observe the barium moving through the digestive system to see if it is working properly. For example, the doctor will see whether the muscles that control swallowing are functioning properly. The radiologist can take an X-ray as the barium moves into the small intestine. The exam takes 15-30 minutes to complete if Small Bowel also being done could take up to 4 hours.

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Fluoroscopy - IVP

An Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) is an X-ray of the urinary bladder, kidneys and the ureters. Most people are knowledgeable of X-rays, which generate a still image of the body’s interior by passing a small, yet extremely controlled amount of radiation through the body, and capturing the resulting shadows and reflection on film. For an IVP, a contrasting agent (iodine) is used to enhance the X-ray images. The iodine is injected into the patient. Its progress through the urinary tract is recorded on a sequence of quickly captured images. An IVP allows the radiologist to view the anatomy and function of the kidneys and urinary tract.

Preparation

  1. Light dinner the evening before the exam
  2. 2 oz. of Castor Oil (you can get it at the pharmacy) after dinner, then nothing to eat or drink
  3. Fleet Enema the morning of the exam

If you are diabetic, you must not take the following medications 2 days before and 2 days after the test:

  • Glucophage
  • Metformin
  • Glucovance
  • Metaglip
  • Avandament
  • Fortamet
  • Glumetza
  • Diaformin
  • Riomet
  • Diabex
  • Actoplus

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Fluoroscopy - Esophagram

An Esophagram or Barium Swallow exam enables the radiologist to examine the function and appearance of the esophagus. The swallowing process is also evaluated. This test, which is ordered by a physician, is used to assess symptoms of difficult or painful swallowing, weight loss, abdominal pain and bloodstained vomit. An Esophagram allows the radiologist to identify ulcers, polyps, tumors, and enlarged veins, which can cause bleeding. In addition, the radiologist can view any problems with the esophagus, such as narrowing or irritation, blockages and a hiatal hernia (the upper part of the stomach slides through the diaphragm).

Preparation

  1. Do not eat, drink, smoke or chew gum after midnight.

Esophagram Explained

During the test, you’ll drink a cup of barium while the radiologist observes and evaluates the swallowing process using a fluoroscopy. X-rays are taken to track the path of the barium to the stomach. To ensure that each structure is represented well on the X-rays, you’ll be placed in various positions. The test only takes 15-30 minutes.

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Fluoroscopy - Barium Enema

A Barium Enema or Lower GI exam is performed to examine the large intestine (rectum and colon). This test enables your physician to identify diseases and other conditions that affect the large intestine. During the test, the colon is filled with a contrast material containing barium. This makes the intestine visible on an X-ray image. The contrast material is inserted into the rectum by using a tube. The procedure takes approximately 45 minutes to an hour.

Preparation

  1. Pick up a preparation kit at Main Street Radiology

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Mammograms

The Breast Questionnaire must be filled out for all Mammograms. Please bring with you any previous mammograms and any breast related images you have. These images are important to improve the quality of the mammogram interpretation.

During a mammogram, a low-dose radiation system is used to examine the breasts. Mammograms enable your physician to identify breast diseases early.

On the day of your exam, do not wear deodorant, talcum powder or lotion. These can appear on the test results.

How is the procedure performed?

During the exam, a radiology technologist will place your breast on a special platform on the mammography system, and use a paddle made of Plexiglas or another plastic to gradually compress your breast.

Breast compression is necessary because:

  • It evens out breast thickness so that all of breast tissue can be examined.
  • Stretches the tissue so that small abnormalities are less likely to be covered by overlying breast tissue.
  • It enables the technologist to use a lower X-ray dose, since a thinner amount of tissue is being X-rayed.
  • Keeps the breast still, which reduces blurring.
  • Decreases X-ray scatter, which increases sharpness.

During X-ray exposure, the technologist will stand behind a glass shield. You will have to change positions between images, and the same process will be repeated for the other breast.

What should I expect during the procedure?

You must remain very still. The technologist may ask you to hold your breath for a few seconds while the X-ray is being taken. This decreases blurriness. The exam takes about 15 minutes. As your breast is compressed, you will feel pressure. If your breasts are sensitive, you may experience discomfort. If that is the case, please schedule your mammogram when your breasts are least tender.

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Breast Ultrasound

The Breast Questionnaire must be filled out for all Breast Ultrasounds.

During an ultrasound, a portion of the body is exposed to high-frequency sound waves to generate an image(s) of the inside of the body. An ultrasound is non-invasive.

How is the procedure performed?

You’ll be instructed to lie on your back on the exam table, with your arm raised above your head. A clear gel is applied to the area of interest, which helps the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminates any air pockets between the transducer and the skin. The ultrasound technologist firmly presses the transducer against the skin and sweeps it back and forth over the area. A bilateral breast exam takes 45 minutes and a unilateral breast exam takes 15 minutes.

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MRI Questionnaire

To better serve you, we ask that you please complete this MRI questionnaire prior to your exam.

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MRI Prostate Questionnaire

To better serve you, we ask that you please complete this MRI Prostate questionnaire prior to your exam.

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Specific Ultrasounds

Please follow the following guidelines when preparing for your specific ultrasound.

Abdomen / Pelvic (male) no food / drink 1 glass of water 1 hour prior to exam
Abdomen no food or drink 6 hours prior to exam
Abdomen limited no food or drink 6 hours prior to exam
Aorta no food or drink 6 hours prior to exam
US Breast - bilateral no perfume powder/deodorant if having mammogram also
US Breast - left no perfume powder/deodorant if having mammogram also
US Breast - right no perfume powder/deodorant if having mammogram also
US Carotid doppler none
US Lower Extremity doppler none
US Umbilical Artery doppler none
US Upper Extremity doppler none
US Lower Extremity non-vascular none
US OB 1st trimester drink 32 ozs of water 1 hour prior to exam and hold urine
if transvaginal no prep necessary
US OB 2nd/3rd trimester none
US OB additional fetus none
US OB limited study none
US OB transvaginal none
US Parathyroid none
US Pelvic endovaginal none
US Pelvic (routine) drink 32 ozs of water 1 hour prior to exam and hold urine
US Renal drink 1 glass of water 1 hour prior to exam
US Testicular none
US Thyroid none
US Transplanted Kidney with doppler drink 1 glass of water 1 hour prior to exam
US Upper Extremity non-vascular none
US Abdomen-renal no food / drink 1 glass of water 1 hour prior to exam
US Abdomen with doppler no food or drink 6 hours prior to exam
US Pelvic & Endovaginal drink 32 ozs of water 1 hour prior to exam and hold urine
US Pelvic doppler should be done transvaginal no prep necessary
US Renal doppler drink 1 glass of water 1 hour prior to exam
US Testicular doppler none

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